When the journey seems futile…

I first read this post and it brought tears to my eyes… I don’t know, the honesty of it, perhaps, they humanity of it, certainly. Then I read it again and commented, in a rather, I don’t know, stupid way – shallow, self-centered. So I read it again, and again. I saw that Roger at Woebegone but Hopeful reblogged it… so I read it again by going through his blog, and those words of Lisa Palmer kept gnawing at me. I’m reblogging it here, perhaps in the hope of seeing more comments on it. Maybe take a few minutes to read it, then let Lisa know what you make of it. Thank you.

the otherhood of one

I know I’m not alone in feeling this way, as though all of my efforts have failed.  As though every single thing I have attempted to accomplish in my life has fallen short; it simply isn’t enough to get the job done.  As though my very tenacity and determination to continue are some sort of cosmic joke being played upon me and my psyche.  Like failure itself was written into my karma and destiny…

And when that feeling overwhelms me, and I am convinced I simply cannot try anymore, when everything within me seeks shelter from the never-ending storm, I crawl into bed and cry myself to sleep.  Hoping, and sometimes praying, that this journey will soon end for me…

But I wake up again.  Always.  Disappointed.  Discouraged.  Angry, even, at why this life won’t let me go!  And then…

Some time during that hopeless day, some thing will happen…

View original post 1,111 more words

14 thoughts on “When the journey seems futile…

  1. Rosaliene Bacchus

    Lisa raises many valid points about the reality of the lives of people who care about others and act upon their concern. She emphasizes, and I totally agree with her, that “they do not act to serve others, but they serve others as an authentic expression of themselves!” I would like to add that their service to others is a joy or satisfaction in itself. They expect no reward, no thanks. Our world, as she points out, is prone to abuse such individuals. She notes:

    “They are also the ones most often shit upon, taken advantage of, used up and tossed aside when all of their resources are gone. You know this person; I know you do! And we vacillate between calling them victims, weak, servile, and accepting them as angels, helpers, and personal saviors…”

    As you know, I’ve been reflecting a lot recently on humanity’s abuse of the web of life for the accumulation of capital and the enrichment of a few (the One Percent). We-humans are all guilty of abusing other living species on our planet. We-humans “shit upon, [take] advantage of, [use] up and [toss] aside when all of their resources are gone.” It’s therefore not surprising that we treat other humans in the same way.

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Thanks for your comment, Rosaliene. Quote: “As you know, I’ve been reflecting a lot recently on humanity’s abuse of the web of life for the accumulation of capital and the enrichment of a few (the One Percent).”
      Indeed you have been very vocal, and have posted works from powerful and self-sacrificing individuals on your blog to make this point very clear. Certainly you, Rosaliene, could never be faulted for not trying. I think of Lisa’s post this way: we’re in a canoe and suddenly my paddle breaks, useless. Lisa sees the situation and comes up with the only solution she can think of so we can share the process of paddling forward: she sacrifices her paddle by splitting it in half lengthwise and passes one half to me (or whomever). Not a great analogy, but that’s what the giver does and there is sacrifice in it, all the time. There is loss. It is the givers, such as they are, who stand against the takers, and that without even opposing them directly.

      Reply
  2. Regis Auffray

    A most meaningful, apt, and timely article by Lisa. I left a brief comment. There is not much that I can add to all that has been stated already.

    Regis

    *Régis (Reg) Auffray*

    *Email:*

    *rauffray@shaw.ca *

    *Website:*

    *http://www.authorsden.com/regisjauffray *

    *Facebook:* *http://www.facebook.com/people/Regis_Auffray/538821429 *

    ​ ​ ​

    On Tue, Mar 6, 2018 at 8:23 PM, ~Burning Woman~ wrote:

    > Sha’Tara posted: “I first read this post and it brought tears to my > eyes… I don’t know, the honesty of it, perhaps, they humanity of it, > certainly. Then I read it again and commented, in a rather, I don’t know, > stupid way – shallow, self-centered. So I read it again, and” >

    Reply
  3. Woebegone but Hopeful

    I witnessed, in Lisa despite the pain and the despair a raw courage and determination to go on. For this she is to be applauded.

    Reply
  4. Phil Huston

    Everyone has doubts. Mother Teresa had hers. Service knowing it wasn’t solving anything. But if you listen carefully you realize we’re here for two reasons. To fart around, and mend broken hearts. The broken need help. They are the less broken’s job. Those who can’t see past “stuff” are not worth discussing. Next.

    Reply
    1. Phil Huston

      Yeah, maybe that is the Teach the World to Sing, buy them a Coke version, but come on. All the time we gas bag about it could be spent in pursuit…

      Reply
      1. Sha'Tara Post author

        Thanks for commenting, Phil. Just trying to follow your line of reasoning here, I’m not sure how to take it. Do you mean we should not comment on someone’s expression of their humanity? Not use words to express support or gratitude or encouragement? If we are not “permitted” to express ourselves with written words, then why blog? Why be here at all? There are some of us who do both, share life with, as you put it, the broken while at the same time making ourselves less broken, and sharing those experiences here, in words. One doesn’t preclude the other.

  5. Phil Huston

    No, I’m saying, oddly enough for me, “brevity.” That’s all. Reminding people we’re bummed out but doing good things is sorta like spiritual narcissism, in way. Pat me on the back, I didn’t kick a dog today when I felt like it. Pulling yourself up by the boot straps and discovering compassion is its own reward is 230 words as a story. Reminding people you are compassionate is the other thing that’s its own reward. Bravo! You didn’t kick the dog! You loaned a shoulder to friend with dying mate! Two “attaboys” and a “way to go!” – Next. Brevity. Particularly when it comes down to self congratulatory epistles. My dad was in my ass one day and I said “At least I’m not in jail!” and he looked at me in shock. “WTF? You’re not SUPPOSED to be in jail.” See what I’m saying there? Doing good is the deal, there’s only one reason to let everyone else know…All I’m sayin’.

    However, next time I roll my chair over a sleeping dog’s tail and I apologize, I’ll be sure to post about it.

    Reply

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