The Reconciliation of Opposites and the Politics

I would have loved to be the one to write this essay, if I had Aishwariya Ramachandran knowledge and skill with words. This should be read by every single human being on this world, then seriously pondered upon.

7 thoughts on “The Reconciliation of Opposites and the Politics

  1. kertsen

    A very accurate list of humankinds failings : ‘ inside each of us lives and then the long list of negatives murderer, rapist, racist, tyrant, death , famine , hatred, evil , misery, caprice. You go on to say we project out into the world the division we have within. So the lesson is a Buddhist one change must start within. We have had this message around since the beginning of Buddhism and a minute few may well have taken it up seriously and wrought inner change but for the majority of mankind it has not happened.
    Why not ?The reason is simple we act out as a race our cooperate natures , we cannot help but to be what we are. Let me say we have other qualities : kindness , loyalty , self – sacrifice , goodness, and all the positive qualities mixed up with the negative ones. That is why Freud said we are at war with ourselves.
    The Christian Religion takes this same argument a step further : we cannot save ourselves’ from our own nature and we need a Saviour but there is not evidence that a Saviour can do the job so allowance is made in the form of the Old Man who is lurking in us all making us sinners .

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Thanks for your perspective, Kertsen. Yes, change has to come from within. If it is from outside, it becomes forced and as history demonstrates, whatever is forced on us we eventually, ultimately reject. If I want a better world, I must become a better person and it is entirely up to me to make that difficult choice – for changing one’s nature is difficult. It demands total focus, detachment and the development of self empowerment. Self discipline and constant self-correction is the way of one who would be a change agent.

      Reply
  2. Phil Huston

    “…whereby no genuine insight or change of opinion can occur. They have manufactured distractions from the point where all of us can make the most impact: the immediate present, the here and now of our own lives.”

    The “I” syndrome. Where I ate, what I think, what I wore, then pictures I took, the blog I wrote. I, I, I. Sounds like a cheap solo Mariachi at a Mexican dive.

    Although he is flowery, and ocassionally digresses from his own elitist distancing, (white males are the root of all evil, etc.) the author makes several valid points he then drops blankets of words on, rendering them ineffectual. I’d like to read the Reader’s Digest version sans the “validating” of comma offset clauses. Because buried in all that wordiness he’s right. We are disnfranchised by our technology. We are fed shit and kept in the dark. EVERY aspect of factionalization, not just corporate or neo nazi, pisses in the stream of Social Media. In a “free” country SM has made having an opinion other than whoever is ranting economically dangerous. Here’s a new one. Liberal Fascism. Gang rule, intolerance, bullshit the size of billboards. Reactionalism has made everyone pinballs, bouncing, reeling off the latest “issue” bumper and into the next with no concept of history.

    And all the pissing and moaning? It’s not this week’s president’s fault. It’s down to us. All of us paying lip service and looking the other way right along with the politicos and corporations.

    Change I to we. There’s the difference. But wait, I’m on WordPress, the album version of FaceBook where I is king and bullshit is the order of the day. Flowery, overwritten bullshit, generally. Opinions and a Thesaurus to the recue! While the middle class oxy casualty with a BMW down the street tried to steal my lawnmower. Out of touch. Out of persepctive. What happens when I is the center of the world and the number of likes for the sound of your voice just makes it louder, even if it’s hot air. How cool is that? I. I. I.

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Tough perspective there Phil but it’s OK, we’re all self-centred and selfish, I understand. Still, we must communicate our ideas or what are we, machines? Zombies? This young woman, Aishwariya, is a very intelligent person. I’ve re-blogged some of her other essays before. She makes excellent points about our nature and how we interact with one-another. Thank you for commenting, as always.

      Reply
      1. Phil Huston

        Indeed she does. Op eds and opinions are a lok like assholes. I’m glad everyone has one. I’m weary of them sharing them. “I” is the problem, Not the source for a soultion.

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